Baldwin’s Sunday Story Wx Blog For Apr 26th

Weekend Edition

Wx Blog Slides (53)

Weather Headlines

A cold, damp Sunday

Pleasant weather to start the week

Stormy midweek

Main threats

SUNDAY NIGHT: Possible frost if skies clear out.

WEDNESDAY: A strong storm or two is possible. Widespread severe weather is not expected.

THURSDAY NIGHT: Frost possible

Baldwin’s 7-Day forecast

Wx Blog Slides (52)

Daily Forecast

Today: Scattered showers and much cooler. Highs will be in the 40s most of the day, with a breeze. Frost is possible late tonight if skies clear.

Monday: Very nice and sunny.

Tuesday: Another nice day, though clouds will be on the increase. Rain develops overnight.

Wednesday: Rain and storms. Some storms could be strong. Windy.

Thursday: A chance of showers, especially in the morning.

Friday – Saturday: Sunny and pleasant.

Almanac

Wx Blog Slides (54)

Yesterday’s National High and Low Temperature

High: 106 degrees at Buttercup, California

Low: 12 at Pikes Peak, Colorado

Difference of: 118 degrees

Wx Hazards Across the Nation

It’s a rather quiet Sunday across the country. Only light precip is expected. The only exception is central Florida, where some stronger storms may occur today. Heat continues across the southwester US, where many heat advisories are in place.

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Records

On this day in 1834 killer frosts occurred throughout the Deep South. The frost was considered severe for northern Alabama, wiping out all budding vegetation.

A strong storm system on this day in 1978 produced the first thunderstorm ever recorded in Fairbanks, Alaska in the month of April. Oddly, the storm even produced pea-sized hail, despite having cloud tops that were only 8,000 feet high.

Sunday Story

Tennessee Twisters

It’s been a rough spring storm season in Tennessee. In fact, this season is on track to be one of the worst our state has ever seen. 

Unfortunately, Tennessee is no stranger to bad storms. Our state leads the nation in tornado outbreaks containing three or more strong to violent tornadoes (EF-2+). That means that when we have tornado outbreaks, they tend to contain powerful tornadoes. We out-pace any state in Tornado Alley for that dreadful statistic. 

Tennessee also ranks in the top statistics for the number of people killed by nighttime tornadoes. It’s a terrible combination; powerful tornadoes in the middle of the night. 

To make matters even worse, we get tornadoes in any month of the year. Sure, we get most of our tornadoes in April, but we have had tornadoes in every month of the year. 

That’s a stark contrast to Tornado Alley out on the plains. Their tornado season is much more defined. They see nearly all of their tornadoes in April and May, with rare exceptions. 

Tennessee is geographically located in a position to easily see clashes of air masses any time of year. We are the perfect meeting ground for cold air coming down from the north that clashes with warm, humid air coming up from the Gulf of Mexico. 

The nighttime tornadoes are often the result of bad timing. Storm systems typically begin organizing on the southern plains in the daytime, making their way into the South during the night. 

This all means we need to stay weather-aware in Tennessee. Have a weather radio and multiple other sources for getting weather alerts. Have a severe weather plan and practice it often. Let’s hope for quieter weather ahead, but let’s be prepared for whatever comes our way.

You all have a great day!

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