Meteorologist Mark’s Wx Blog for Sun., Dec. 6

Headlines 

Snow flurries possible tonight & Monday (no accumulation)

A cold start to the week

A warming trend begins by Wednesday

Rain returns at the end of the week

Meteorologist Mark’s Vlog in a Flash

48-Hour WX

Seven-Day Forecast

Daily Forecast Summary

Today: Partly cloudy, with clouds increasing by evening. Snow flurries possible overnight. No accumulation.

Monday: Mostly cloudy. Snow flurries possible. No accumulation. Cold.

Tuesday: Mostly sunny but cold.

Wednesday – Thursday: Mostly sunny. A warming trend begins.

Friday: Partly cloudy, but clouds should be increasing. Showers overnight.

Saturday: Mostly cloudy, with a chance for showers. Mild.

Threats

No hazardous weather is expected over the next seven days.

On This Day in Wx History

1886 – A great snowstorm hit the southern Appalachian Mountains. The three-day storm produced 25 inches at Rome, Georgia, 33 inches at Asheville, North Carolina, and 42 inches in the higher mountains. Even Montgomery, Alabama received a record eleven inches of snow! Columbia, South Carolina received one to two inches of sleet.

Almanac

Yesterday’s National Temperature Extremes

High: 87° at Homestead & Immokalee, Florida 

Low: -16° at both Peter Sinks & Stanley, Idaho

Today’s National Wx Hazards

Accumulating snowfall can be found across New England again today. More snow will fall across the Pacific Northwest, as a new storm system moves in. Other flakes can be found flying across the southern Appalachians, as well as across the Great Lakes region.

Tomorrow’s National Wx Hazards

A very quiet day!

 Sunday Story

As the calendar turns to December, our thoughts turn to Christmas. Those thoughts then often turn to wondering if Christmas will be white? Some approach that wonder with dread, while others approach that wonder with child-like excitement. 

Historically, our chances for a white Christmas are quite slim. In fact, we only have about a 10% chance of that happening. Still, thanks to the plateau, our chances are better than much of the rest of the state.  

Looking at long-range model data, an active subtropical jet stream is expected to be in place for much of December, which means moisture will likely be available. All we then need is cold air. As we all know, that’s a reunion that has been hard to come by in recent years, not just at Christmas, but throughout the whole winter. 

In order to get snow to fall, we need a thick layer of sub-freezing temperatures in the atmosphere above us. To get that snow to accumulate, we need the ground to be sub-freezing, too. The colder the temperatures, the “drier” the snow. Temperatures hovering right around freezing lead to a higher moisture content (ie. wetter snow). 

That moisture content makes a big difference in accumulations. While one inch of rain makes about 10 inches of snow, the drier snows may lead to one inch of rain creating as much as 20 inches of snow! If the snow is wetter (ie. warmer) once inch of rain may equal as little as five inches of snow.  

Overall, much of the winter is expected to be rather mild. But just remember, it only takes the moisture meeting the cold air one time to make for a big snow. It’s even more unique if that reunion can happen on the most magical day of the year! 

You all have a great day!

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2 thoughts on “Meteorologist Mark’s Wx Blog for Sun., Dec. 6

  1. I have noticed that the low temps for the lower 48 states is frequently recorded in Peter Sinks, Utah. What and where is this place?

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