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MM’s Thurs Wx Forecast (Dec. 2)

Spring-like temps to start off December

MM’s Wx Vlog 

Today’s Afternoon Wx Map

High pressure is in control of the Southeast, bringing sunshine and very mild weather.

Daily weather map showing fronts and precipitation. Valid for this afternoon. See precip legend at the lower left.

Local Seven-Day Forecast

Thursday – Friday: Mostly sunny. Unseasonably warm.

Saturday: Partly sunny. Continued mild.

Sunday: Chance for afternoon showers. Mild. Rain likely overnight.

Monday: Mainly morning rain showers. Cooler.

Tuesday: Partly to mostly cloudy. Windy.

Wednesday: Rain & possible thunder.

Radar 

https://www.wunderground.com/radar/us/tn/nashville/ohx

MM’s Wx Concerns

Today’s Stats

Almanac for Yesterday  

 National High Temps for Today 

Unseasonably warm temps have taken over much of the country.

Shading indicates the departure from normal. Bluer colors indicated below normal temps, while oranges and reds indicate above-normal temps. See scale on the left. The red star indicates where the national maximum temp is expected, the blue star shows the location of the minimum.

National Low Temps for Tonight  

Shading indicates the departure from normal. Bluer colors indicated below normal temps, while oranges and reds indicate above-normal temps. See scale on the left. The red star indicates where the national maximum temp is expected, the blue star shows the location of the minimum.

24-Hour Temperature Change 

Most of the eastern US is warmer, or even much warmer, this morning than they were yesterday morning.

This map shows the change in temperature from yesterday morning to this morning. Reds indicate warmer temps, while blue indicates colder temps compared to temps 24 hours ago. See scale on the left that shows how many degrees difference was calculated.

On This Day in Wx History

1991- Nashville measures 3.07″ of rainfall, for a 3-day total of 5.96″. Crossville receives 3.57″ for a remarkable 3-day total of 8.16″.

MM News

The next MM Kids class will be Tuesday, December 14, at 4:00 pm at TCAT. Suggested age range is 8 yrs and up. (Note: the date was changed from the 7th to the 14th).

This hour-long class focuses on weather folklore. We’ll discuss what works and what doesn’t and why. We’ll also discuss just how complex our planet’s atmosphere is and what that means for folklore. A hands-on activity will make the lesson come to life! Sign up at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeJd9uESXEQKxIxF07Hk0BxcDaCsCpxWHVceM-YqtZzww7y7Q/viewform

Earth’s complex atmosphere. Credit: NASA.

Drought Monitor 

The data cutoff for Drought Monitor maps is each Tuesday at 7 a.m. The maps, which are based on analysis of the data, are released each Thursday at 7:30 a.m.

This is the latest map, issued today!

Summary

Several Pacific weather systems moved across the contiguous U.S. (CONUS) during this U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM) week. An upper-level ridge over the western CONUS directed the systems across the northern states, while a cutoff low trekked across Texas then into the Gulf of Mexico. The Pacific systems dragged cold fronts with them that stretched the width of the CONUS, from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico coast. The fronts triggered rain and snow over parts of the country, but they were starved of precipitation by the western ridge and its northwesterly flow over the central CONUS. As a result, the week was wetter than normal only in parts of the Pacific Northwest, northern Rockies, Great Lakes, and Texas. The weather was drier than normal across the rest of the CONUS with large parts of the West, Great Plains, Upper Mississippi Valley, and Southeast receiving no precipitation. Most of the West and Great Plains were warmer than normal thanks to the western ridge. The persistent above-normal temperatures contributed to excessive evapotranspiration in western portions of the Great Plains as well as parts of the West, as seen in EDDI and ESI indicators. Lack of precipitation, excessive evapotranspiration, and windy conditions further dried soils, again especially in western portions of the Plains, as seen in several soil moisture indicators. Drought indicators such as the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) reflected the mounting precipitation deficits. The continued dryness expanded or intensified drought in parts of the southern to central Rockies, Great Plains, Lower to Mid-Mississippi Valley, Southeast, and Mid-Atlantic states, as well as Puerto Rico.

Estimated Population in Drought Areas in the South: Last week: 5,614,886 This Week: 8,608,590

Meteorologist Mark Pro 

Each week’s newsletter is something for any science nerd to look forward to! Each week’s letter contains an educational and informative story, along with other interesting tidbits concerning recent news and developments. Many of the stories are about our own Cumberland Plateau! In the latest newsletter you’ll find a story about something called a Chinook wind. This story and more are available each Wednesday for subscribers at https://meteorologistmarkpro.com/.

The FREE kids newsletter is available at that site, too. Just follow the link to “Newsletter for Kids.” The latest edition was published yesterday!

Subscriptions to the weekly newsletter go to support MM’s education outreach, including the FREE monthly kids newsletter available at https://meteorologistmarkpro.com/Subs are just $6 a month if you pay monthly and only $5 a month if you pay annually! That’s quite the deal for a local weekly newsletter that’s always very interesting! Thank you!

You all have a great day and keep lookin’ up!

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