Sunday Story: Summer’s heat no match for the mountain

We are so fortunate to be able to call this Cumberland Plateau our home. The scenery is beautiful and our summers are rather pleasant, especially compared to the rest of the state.

Our average dates of hitting 90 degrees for the first and last time within a summer season on the plateau is July 8 and August 16, respectively. Those dates are May 27 and September 15 for Nashville. The latest Nashville has ever gone without hitting 90 degrees in summer was July 5, 1893.

There have been several summers, since record keeping began, in which the plateau never saw a single 90-degree temperature reading. The least 90-degree days Nashville has had is 11 and that was way back in 1889. Again, Nashville has hit 90 degrees at least once in every single summer since records have been kept.

The most 90-degree days we have ever had on the plateau is 45 back in 1954. In that same year, the city of Nashville recorded 96 days of 90-degree heat! That’s more than twice what we had here on the plateau.

The earliest we have ever hit 90 degrees on the plateau was on May 13, 1962. The earliest for Nashville was April 9, 2011. That’s more than a month earlier than us.

The latest we have ever recorded a 90-degree day was September 22, 1980. Nashville has seen 90-degree weather as last as October 19 (2016).

The summer of 2007 was one of the hottest on record for the plateau. That was when we hit 90 degrees or better for 19 days in a row. You think that was bad? Nashville hit 90+ degrees for 34 straight days that summer.

So, while our summers may get quite warm here on the plateau, just be glad you’re up here on this mountain!

5-day outlook (9)

2 thoughts on “Sunday Story: Summer’s heat no match for the mountain

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