MM’s Sun Wx Blog for June 13

MM News

A very special HAPPY BIRTHDAY to the very lucky mother of Meteorologist Mark! (ha) Happy birthday, Mom!

Weather Headlines 

One last hot and humid day!

Lower humidity begins moving in tomorrow

Humidity stays away until Friday (a very pleasant week ahead!)

Watching a tropical system in the Gulf of Mexico

Meteorologist Mark’s Wx Vlog 

Seven-Day Forecast

Daily Forecast 

Today: Mostly sunny, hot and humid. Be careful in the heat. Showers and storms are liable to develop in the afternoon and evening. Any storm that develops could be strong.

Monday – Thursday: Mostly sunny and pleasant. Enjoy the low humidity while it lasts!

Friday: Mostly sunny. Humidity begins increasing.

Saturday: Hot and humid, with a chance for showers and thunderstorms.

Hay Weather Forecast

Meteorologist Mark’s Wx Concerns

Be careful in the heat and humidity again today. Stay hydrated and take breaks in the shade if you must be outside.

Like yesterday, widespread severe weather is not expected, but any storm that develops could become locally and briefly severe, with damaging winds being the main threat.

Almanac for Yesterday

Tropics 

An area of low pressure continues to slowly organize in the Bay of Campeche. It is also moving very, very slowly. As we go through this week, this area of low pressure is expected to develop into a tropical depression or tropical storm. By the weekend, it may be producing very heavy rainfall for parts of the northern Gulf Coast. Anyone with travel plans to the Gulf by next weekend should monitor this situation very closely.

Sun & The Moon

Planting by the Moon in June

On This Day in Wx History

1984 – Severe thunderstorms struck Denver, deluging the city with five inches of rain and leaving up to six feet of water in some places. Softball size hail smashed windshields and ripped through metal cars. Snow plows had to be called out.

Yesterday’s National Temperature Extremes

High:  112° at Rio Grande Village, Texas, Death Valley, California, and Sabino Canyon & Cibola, Arizona

Low:   20° at Peter Sinks, Utah 

Sunday Story

When we hear the phrase “Tornado Alley”, it might imply that there is a region of the country, typically on the plains, that is more prone to tornadic activity. That is a gross misinterpretation of tornado climatology in our country. 

That is why many meteorologists would like to see an end to the phrase “Tornado Alley.” 

Last year, there were more tornadoes in the South than on the plains. Last year wasn’t the first time that’s happened and it certainly won’t be the last. 

The plains typically see tornadoes in March, April, and May. Outside of those months, there’s hardly any severe storm activity (typically). In the South, we face a risk of tornadoes year round, thanks in part to the easy access to warm, humid air from the nearby Gulf of Mexico. 

Last year, the National Weather Service (NWS) in Birmingham, Alabama issued 39 tornado warnings. The NWS in Oklahoma City only issued 30.

To make matters worse, more people are killed in tornadoes in the South than on the plains. Many of the tornadoes on the plains occur in the daylight hours. That is why we see so many clear videos of tornadoes on the open plains from storm chasers, but it also means folks in their path can see them coming too. 

In the South, many of our tornadoes come at night. This means folks can’t see them and that makes the situation much more dangerous. Plus, there aren’t as many nice tornado videos, which can lead folks to think we don’t have as many tornadoes as the plains’ states do.

Tornado Alley is certainly a place to be weather aware in the spring, but let’s not forget that the South is a place to be weather aware for tornadoes every month of the year. 

You all have a great day and keep lookin’ up!

Note: To offer support to Meteorologist Mark and his educational outreach programs, please consider giving via  https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/meteorologistmark. If you can’t give, no worries! Just keep following and tell your friends! 

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What caused those high winds this evening?

Today’s heat and humidity led to some storms this evening that caused quite the stir! I have a downed oak tree that thankfully fell away from the road. It was in bad shape, but it’s withstood a lot of wind in its day. Others of you have some roof damage, downed trees, and other wind-blown damages of various degrees.

Thankfully, the storms moved through rather fast and didn’t linger. I was in Tractor Supply when the storm hit Crossville and it got a little loud. The automatic doors got stuck on “open” and so I had a real good view of the storm! ha

While it was very humid here at the surface, there was actually quite a bit of dry air aloft. That should have kept us dry today but the heat and humidity overcame that hindrance. The rain chance for today was 10%, but it should have been more on the lines of 50%. I have more to say about this dry air beneath the diagram below.

The storms that did manage to fire off this evening created very strong winds along their gust fronts. I hope the diagram below helps explain what I’m talking about. As the rain falls from a storm, it sends out a rush of cooler air known as a gust front. You feel that cool rush of air before a storm and some even claim the air “smells like rain.” That cooler air creates a “baby cold front” (gust front) that creates new clouds and then new storms, if conditions are right. That’s what we saw this evening. One storm would form and then send out a very windy gust front that would then kick off a new storm and repeat all over again.

MWN Blog: July 2012

To make matters worse for us today, the dry air aloft caused some of the rain that was falling from the storm to evaporate above us. Evaporation is a cooling process and cooler air is heavy. That creates a situation where the heavier, cooler air above us gets so heavy that it dramatically falls to the ground, causing very gusty winds. Sometimes winds created in this way can exceed 100 mph. From what I’ve seen, the winds with our storms were probably in the 60 -70 mph range.

Storms fired off so quickly that the NWS was not able to issue any warnings. That’s why your weather radios didn’t go off and why you didn’t get alerts on your phone.

A cold front will pass through here tomorrow evening and it could kick off some more storms. As with any summer storm, any storm that develops will be capable of gusty winds, cloud-to-ground lightning, and very heavy rainfall.

Behind this cold front, a much drier airmass will move in, giving us a very nice week for weather.

You all take care and enjoy the evening.

MM’s Sat Wx Blog for June 12

MM News

The Meteorologist Mark kids class being offered Tuesday evening still has some spots available. The topic is fire tornadoes and we’ll even be making a fire tornado in the parking lot! Registration is required and that form can be found at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdohiaR1Slm0CYWnwhQSi8w0LyY51aAO91OJpffFSabw3FOqQ/viewform. See you there!

Weather Headlines 

A hot and humid weekend (Be careful in the heat!)

Less humid air arrives Sunday night

Watching a tropical system in the Gulf

The hay weather forecast is back!

Meteorologist Mark’s Wx Vlog 

Seven-Day Forecast

Daily Forecast 

Today: Hot and humid. Be careful in the heat.

Sunday: Hot and humid, with chance for an afternoon/evening shower or storm.

Monday – Thursday: Cool mornings and warm afternoons. Very low humidity levels will make it feel quite comfortable.

Friday: Continued dry, but humidity begins to increase.

Hay Weather Forecast (Back by popular demand!)

Please be mindful of the heat today and tomorrow. Make sure you hydrate and take breaks to cool off. The “feels like” temperature will likely be in the 90s to 100 degrees out in those hay fields.

Meteorologist Mark’s Wx Concerns

Just be careful in the heat this weekend! Make sure you hydrate and stay cool.

Almanac for Yesterday

Tropics 

The National Hurricane Center continues to monitor an area of low pressure in the southern Gulf of Mexico. That area of low pressure is expected to slowly organize this weekend and could become a tropical storm by the middle of next week. The system is then forecast to track northward, toward the northern Gulf Coast.

This system is a slow one. It will be slow to develop, and it will be slow to move. The high pressure that will bring us beautiful weather this week will both help this system develop and keep it blocked to the south. In time, that will change.

Right now, many models show very heavy rainfall moving onto the Gulf Coast by Saturday. Some of that moisture will move north to us, but indications are that much of that moisture will be hindered by the area of high pressure that will still be holding on in our area. I’ll keep an eye on that. Anyone with plans to the Gulf Coast next weekend should monitor this system very closely.

Sun & The Moon

Planting by the Moon 

On This Day in Wx History

1968- Golfball size hail is reported with a severe thunderstorm in Putnam County.

Yesterday’s National Temperature Extremes

High:  116° at Rio Grande Village, Texas

Low:   12° at Copper Basin, Idaho (Does Ma Nature even know it’s June?! ha) 

Drought Monitor

The drought monitor is updated each Thursday.

Weather SnapShots

A beautiful sunset in Herndon, Kentucky last evening. Photo by Joshua Claussen (@StormyClaussen).

NASA Nerdology 

Check out this photo from April 1972! In this photo, Charles M. Duke Jr. is collecting lunar samples at Station Number One. The Apollo 16 lunar module pilot is standing just outside the rim of the Plum crater with the parked Lunar Roving Vehicle in the background.

Incidentally, that rover is (of course) still there. When we go back to the Moon, there is no reason for astronauts not to be able to ride that same rover around!

You all have a great day and keep lookin’ up!

Note: To offer support to Meteorologist Mark and his educational outreach programs, please consider giving via  https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/meteorologistmark. If you can’t give, no worries! Just keep following and tell your friends! 

Please feel free to “Follow” me on Social Media!

Facebook @meteorologistmark

Twitter @meteo_mark

Instagram @MeteorologistMark